Someone asked me.

“How do you say “CHANGE”  in Japanese?”

The Japanese word is “Henkaku” and is written below:

henkaku1

For the sake of argument, let’s say Obama were to implement the presidential campaign in Japan.  Should his keyword “change” be translated to the Japanese characters above for key messaging in the campaign?

From marketing perspective, the answer would likely be NO. It should stay in English, as “CHANGE,” and not be translated into the Japanese characters “henkaku.”

The English word “change” is a very common in Japan, and it brings the same attributes as it does in the United States.  It immediately clicks with everyone, similar to how the word “OK” clicks across languages and regions of the world.  Whereas “henkaku” implies mechanical innovation or methodological improvement, “CHANGE” implies something fresh, pro-active, a significant departure from what went before, and even, something better to hope for in the future. 

Below is a graphic that has became popular in Japan.  You can see the attributes in play:

obama-card

When you go into the Japanese market, it is critical how you communicate your own tagline. In many cases, direct translation does not necessarily communicate your message in the market.  Sometimes,  Just like “CHANGE,” a simple, universal term can effectively resonate outside the United States as well.  Knowing the difference can spell the difference between successful localization and not.

Special thanks to Mikal Anderson of LakeOMedia and TokiOMedia for his contributions to this article.

I often blog about how to localize your brand for the Japanese market. You should carefully examine if your brand attributes need to be localized. 

However, some companies can stay with consistent global brand attributes: Ritz and Oreo are the good examples. You see the cultural adjustments here but these TV commercials clearly show the same product attributes.

Ritz commercial

Ritz commercial in Japan

 

OREO commercial

OREO commercial  in Japan

Marketing in Japan? Contact LakeOMedia!

Toyota has launched a new model called “Sette” in Japan. Here is the interesting campaign they are implementing . Very different from what we perceive about Toyota in the United States. sette

This girl in the picture below is a famous Geisha Blogger from Kyoto (my hometown!) who generated a lot of international media buzz through her bilingual blogs (English & Japanese). I just found out that she is taking a short break from blogging.  Too bad but LakeOMedia hopes that she will come back soon!

To read her blogs, click here.  Elegant  web design too!

73221947KK004_geisha

(Photo Source:  DayLife )

spaceball11

 

LakeOMedia and TokiOMedia had a great lunch meeting with an  very accredited and well known off-Broadway musical & film producer  in NY.  We know him for many years and he will be joining LakeOMedia and TokiOMedia as an external creative adviser.  More details will follow on the LakeOMedia and TokiOMedia website very soon.  Stay tuned.

 

 

playbilllogo2

Yesterday, I wrote about how Krispy Kreme localized their website for the Japanese market.  When you promote your products to Japan, the contents you put on a Japanese website and how you put them (taglines, colors, etc.) is an important factor. Knowing  how differently your products and services may be used, and perceived by your target audience in Japan is crucial: You may need to change both the fundamental product attributes and, potentially, the entire brand positioning.

Here is a good example.

Fabreeze by P&G has been highly successful in Japan for many years. One source of the success is careful repositioning of product attributes.

Compare the U.S. verision of the official website

fabus2

with this Japanese version by P&G Japan.

fabjapan

Radically different.

Given the fact that Japanese houses are in general much smaller and that it gets very humid in summer, many households are more concerned about  odor in their rooms and cars.  OK- American households tend to disguise odor by “covering up wih nice scent” (in general.)   Japanese, however, are meticulous (in general). Their reasoning is that you should kill the origin of the odor FIRST and THEN add pleasant scent.

The same thing for perfume. Westerners often use perfume as “Italian (or French) Shower” to kill body odor, but Japanese use perfume only after taking shower (in general).

See the difference?

Oust? Not sure. In the U.S. it seems Fabreeze is far better perceived than Oust. But unfortunately Johnson & Johnson has not introduced Oust to the Japanese market.

If you want to penetrate the Japanese market, contact LakeOMedia or TokiOMedia. We help you reposition your brand in the lucrative Tokyo market.